New study shows cycling helps combat cancer related fatigue

A new study conducted in the UK has found that cycling and walking can help combat fatigue suffered by cancer victims.

The long-lasting tiredness of cancer patients has been linked to both the disease itself and the effects of the intense treatments such as chemotherapy. 

But researchers have found that light or moderate exercise can help combat the side-effects and at very little expense to the patient. 

A new study conducted in the UK has found that cycling and walking can help combat fatigue suffered by cancer victims.

The long-lasting tiredness of cancer patients has been linked to both the disease itself and the effects of the intense treatments such as chemotherapy. 

But researchers have found that light or moderate exercise can help combat the side-effects and at very little expense to the patient. 

“Some people will be well enough that they’re able to go for a jog or go for a bike ride, and if they can, that’s great. But we would encourage people to start with a low level,” a spokesperson from the research team said. 

The study looked at a total of 2600 people with cancer-related fatigue who did or did not go through an exercise program. 

The majority of the research targeted women with breast cancer and the type of exercise program varied from walking, biking to weight training. 

When they evaluated the results they found that physical activity during and after cancer treatment helped to improve the energy of the patient. In particular they found that walking and cycling reduced fatigue more than resistance training. 

“What we do know is there will be an appreciable difference; the average patient will get a benefit from physical activity,” the spokesperson added. 

They also explained how the patients suffering side effects related to blood count could still complete non-aerobic exercise to help with their energy levels.