Cyclist inhale double soot of pedestrians study reveals

A new study has shown that cyclists in London inhale double the amount of soot compared to pedestrians.

The study which was carried out by Prof Jonathan Grigg from the London school of Medicine showed that cyclists inhaled around 2.3 times more soot that those opting to walk. 

A new study has shown that cyclists in London inhale double the amount of soot compared to pedestrians.

The study which was carried out by Prof Jonathan Grigg from the London school of Medicine showed that cyclists inhaled around 2.3 times more soot that those opting to walk.

5 cyclists and 5 pedestrians were tested, all healthy non-smokers aged between 18 and 40.

Dr Chinedu Nwokoro a researcher working on the project said that the results “could be due to a number of factors including the fact that cyclists breathe more deeply and at a quicker rate than pedestrians while in closer proximity to exhaust fumes, which could increase the number of airborne particles penetrating the lungs.”

“Our data strongly suggest that personal exposure to black carbon should be considered when planning cycling routes,” he added.